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CHESS COMMANDS

CHESS TRICKS

Today, we will continue from where we stop last week. Kindly click if you miss it.

Learn how to write special situations.

  • If two or more identical pieces can move to the same square, the letter for the piece is followed by:
    • the file (column) of departure if they differ;
    • the rank (row) of departure if the files are the same but the ranks differ;
    • both the rank and file if neither alone uniquely defines the piece.
    • For example, if two knights on d2 and f2 can both reach e4, the move is denoted as Nde4 or Nfd4, as appropriate. If two knights on d2 and d6 can both reach e4, the move would be denoted as N2d4 or N6d4, as appropriate. If three knights on d2, d6, and f2 can all reach e4, with capture, the move would be denoted as Nd2xe4, N6xe4, or Nfxe4, as appropriate.
  • For pawn promotion, the piece to which it is promoted is written after the destination coordinate. For example, a pawn on e7 moving to e8 and promoting to a knight would be denoted as e8N. Sometimes an equal sign (=) is used, as in e8=N, or parentheses are used, as in e8(N), or a slash (/) is used, as in e8/N. Only the first type is used in FIDE standard.
  • For castling, O-O denotes king side castle, while O-O-O denotes queen side castle.
  • A check is denoted by + after the move notation; double check may be denoted by ++.
  • Checkmate is denoted by # after the move notation. Some older chess literature may denote ++ as checkmate.
  • A 1-0 is used at the end of the game to denote a white win, 0-1 to denote a black win, and ½-½ (or 0.5-0.5) to denote a draw. The words “White Resigns” or “Black Resigns” may be used to denote a resignation.

how to write special situations.

  • If two or more identical pieces can move to the same square, the letter for the piece is followed by:
    • the file (column) of departure if they differ;
    • the rank (row) of departure if the files are the same but the ranks differ;
    • both the rank and file if neither alone uniquely defines the piece.
    • For example, if two knights on d2 and f2 can both reach e4, the move is denoted as Nde4 or Nfd4, as appropriate. If two knights on d2 and d6 can both reach e4, the move would be denoted as N2d4 or N6d4, as appropriate. If three knights on d2, d6, and f2 can all reach e4, with capture, the move would be denoted as Nd2xe4, N6xe4, or Nfxe4, as appropriate.
  • For pawn promotion, the piece to which it is promoted is written after the destination coordinate. For example, a pawn on e7 moving to e8 and promoting to a knight would be denoted as e8N. Sometimes an equal sign (=) is used, as in e8=N, or parentheses are used, as in e8(N), or a slash (/) is used, as in e8/N. Only the first type is used in FIDE[ standard.
  • For castling, O-O denotes king side castle, while O-O-O denotes queen side castle.
  • A check is denoted by + after the move notation; double check may be denoted by ++.
  • Checkmate is denoted by # after the move notation. Some older chess literature may denote ++ as checkmate.
  • A 1-0 is used at the end of the game to denote a white win, 0-1 to denote a black win, and ½-½ (or 0.5-0.5) to denote a draw. The words “White Resigns” or “Black Resigns” may be used to denote a resignation.

Learn the punctuation that is used for commentary on the moves.

  • Punctuation is commonly used to comment on the effectiveness of moves, usually relative to the skill of the player. It is placed after the move. For example:
    • ! a good move
    • !! an excellent move
    • ? a questionable move
    • ?? a blunder
    • !? an interesting move but unclear
    • ?! a dubious move but worth considering

Learn how to put it all together. List of moves are denoted as numbered pairs by White followed by Black. For example, 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5.

  • Moves may be interrupted by comments. When the record resumes with a Black move, an ellipsis (…) takes the place of the White move. For example: 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Black now defends his pawn. 2…Nc6.
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